Cannabis Reform in Arizona



Arizona
Arizona Prop. 300
YES: 43%
NO: 57%
(100% of precincts reporting - CBS News is reporting that Prop. 300 was officially defeated.)

A 'no' vote will allow doctors to continue to prescribe Schedule I drugs without any further authorization from Congress or the FDA.
Referendum relating to the medical use of Schedule I drugs which was put on the ballot to overturn the gutting by the legislature of Prop. 200 (the Drug Medicalization, Prevention and Control Act), which passed by 65% of the vote in 1996.

Up to the minute results:
http://event.cbs.com/state/state_az.html
 
More information on Prop. 300
http://www.levellers.org/azstat.htm


Cannabis-related Ballot Initiatives and Referenda
to be voted on in the November 3, 1998 General Election
Compiled by Colorado Citizens for Compassionate Cannabis
October 10, 1998

Several initiatives will appear on the ballot this year in various states.  Voters in Alaska, Colorado, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, D.C. and Washington State will be decide on the issue of medicinal cannabis.  Additionally, voters in Oregon will decide on a referendum to block the recriminalization of marijuana.  Voters in Arizona will decide on a referendum to block the gutting of the Proposition 200, the Drug Medicalization, Prevention, and Control Act, passed by 65% of Arizona voters in 1996.


ARIZONA Prop. 300
Referendum ordered by Petition of the People relating to the medical use of Schedule I drugs

Text of Prop. 300
http://www.sosaz.com/election/1998Info/PubPamphlet/prop300.html

ANALYSIS BY LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL
In 1996, the voters passed the Drug Medicalization, Prevention and Control Act of 1996.  The Act allowed medical doctors to prescribe 116 Schedule I drugs, including heroin, LSD, marijuana and certain analogs of PCP to treat a disease or to relieve the pain and suffering of a seriously ill or terminally ill patient.

After the 1996 Act passed, the State Legislature enacted House Bill 2518. Before the 116 Schedule I drugs could be prescribed by a doctor, House Bill 2518 requires marijuana to be authorized by the federal food and drug administration or be authorized by the United States Congress. This proposition and the 1996 Act would conditionally allow a doctor to prescribe a Schedule I drug to seriously ill or terminally ill patients. Before prescribing a Schedule I drug, the doctor would have to document that scientific research supports the use of the drug and would have to obtain from a second doctor a written opinion that prescribing the drug is appropriate. A patient who receives, possesses or uses the drug, as prescribed by a doctor would not be subject to state criminal penalties.

If this proposition passes, doctors could begin prescribing Schedule I drugs, including heroin, LSD, marijuana and certain analogs of PCP, only after the federal food and drug administration approves or the United States Congress authorizes the medical use of marijuana or reclassifies marijuana as a drug that doctors can prescribe. If this proposition does not pass, under state law doctors could continue to prescribe Schedule I drugs, including heroin, LSD, marijuana and certain analogs of PCP, without any further authorization from Congress or the FDA.

Constitutional or Statutory: Statutory

Arizona Secretary of State
http://www.sosaz.com/


The Therapeutic Model of Medicine
vs.
The Law Enforcement Model of Medicine

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